History vs. trash in incinerator debate

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
03/03/2010
Opponents of a Frederick County trash incinerator hope they can persuade state lawmakers to put a stop to it based on its proximity to Monocacy National Battlefield. The state Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee is considering a bill that would stop construction of incinerators within a mile of a national park. They considered a similar bill last year but voted it down before it could get to the full Senate. With the proposed incinerator approved for the McKinney site across the river from the battlefield, state Sen. Alex Mooney hopes his bill will gain more traction this year. Mooney, a Republican who represents Frederick and Washington counties, is an incinerator opponent whose district includes several sites considered for the project. He spoke to the committee Tuesday at a bill hearing. "It remains an irresponsible decision to site an incinerator next to a historic battlefield," Mooney said.

Mooney moves to stop incinerator near battlefield

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
02/28/2009
Citing the historic nature of the Monocacy National Battlefield, Sen. Alex Mooney introduced legislation Friday that would prohibit building or operating an incinerator within one mile of a national park. His bill comes in reaction to the Frederick County Commissioners' consideration of a site near the battlefield for an incinerator, also known as a waste-to-energy plant, which would burn trash to generate electricity. It could have a smokestack as tall as 350 feet. The commissioners chose the McKinney Industrial Park as a site to take to public hearing this month. The county-owned site is off Buckeystown Pike. "The battlefield is important, it's an important battle," Mooney said. "I'd hate to see a smokestack put up right next to it, detracting from the attractiveness of the location." Known as the "battle that saved Washington," the one-day conflict at Monocacy delayed Confederate troops as they marched unsuccessfully toward the capital in 1864. Battlefield Superintendent Susan Trail has objected to the site, saying the smokestack would be visually intrusive. The Civil War Preservation Trust named the battlefield one of the most endangered Civil War sites last year because of the incinerator threat. The commissioners have proposed waste-to-energy as a way to combat the county's growing waste disposal needs. They hope to stop the costly practice of hauling trash to a Virginia landfill. Commissioner Kai Hagen, the only opponent of the incinerator on the board, supports Mooney's bill.

Mooney against proposed plant near battlefield

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
02/17/2009
Alex Mooney might use his position in the Maryland State Senate to keep a proposed Frederick County waste-to-energy plant from being built adjacent to the Monocacy National Battlefield. Mooney met with people interested in the issue Monday at the McKinney industrial site off Metropolitan Court near the county's Division of Public Utilities and Solid Waste offices. Until a few weeks ago, he said, he hadn't been involved in the county's proposal to build an incinerator with Carroll County to deal with increasing trash. At a public meeting Feb. 3, the county commissioners decided to schedule a public hearing for tonight on two sites being considered for the incinerator. Both sites are in Mooney's district. One of those sites, where Potomac Edison once planned a power plant east of Point of Rocks, was scrapped last week because it is in the Carrollton Manor Rural Legacy Area.