Mooney against proposed plant near battlefield

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
02/17/2009
Alex Mooney might use his position in the Maryland State Senate to keep a proposed Frederick County waste-to-energy plant from being built adjacent to the Monocacy National Battlefield. Mooney met with people interested in the issue Monday at the McKinney industrial site off Metropolitan Court near the county's Division of Public Utilities and Solid Waste offices. Until a few weeks ago, he said, he hadn't been involved in the county's proposal to build an incinerator with Carroll County to deal with increasing trash. At a public meeting Feb. 3, the county commissioners decided to schedule a public hearing for tonight on two sites being considered for the incinerator. Both sites are in Mooney's district. One of those sites, where Potomac Edison once planned a power plant east of Point of Rocks, was scrapped last week because it is in the Carrollton Manor Rural Legacy Area.

The rest of the waste-to-energy story

Gazette
Jim Racheff
10/23/2008
As a resident of Frederick County who has followed the debate over waste-to-energy closely, I read Carroll County Commissioner Michael Zimmer's letter of Oct. 16 ("Incinerator discussion is good, but let's stick to the facts") with great interest. While I agree with Mr. Zimmer's factual assertions, I feel that his letter neglected "the rest of the story." Mr. Zimmer rightly compares the 1,500-ton-per-day capacity of the proposed regional waste-to-energy incinerator to a car speedometer: "It will tell you how fast the car can go, not how fast you should drive it." I can't speak for Mr. Zimmer, but I frequently see people exceeding the posted speed limits. Even after several years of waste-to-energy discussion, I have yet to hear how our elected officials plan to limit future officials from importing waste from other jurisdictions, or keep materials that are better recycled from becoming a waste-to-energy fuel-source.

Commissioner questions size of proposed incinerator

Gazette
Charles Schelle
04/24/2008
Carroll County Commissioner Julia W. Gouge questions whether a proposed incinerator that Carroll is considering building with Frederick is too big. "We’re building a facility that is much larger than we need right now,” Gouge said. The proposal calls for the incinerator to be built in Frederick County, possibly near the Ballenger Creek-McKinney Wastewater Treatment Plant off Md. Route 85, with Carroll contributing $140 million to the $350 million project. The incinerator would handle 1,500 tons of trash per day, 600 tons of which would come from Carroll. However, Carroll only produces about 320 tons per day.

A healthy dose of skepticism and hope

Gazette
04/10/2008
We are skeptical that America can ever become a society that throws away nothing, or what some environmentalists would call a ‘‘zero-waste” community. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try, or at least search for economical ways to throw away less. Officials from Carroll and Frederick counties have been invited to do just that by taking a trip out West. Caroline Eader — who holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental biology and works as a paralegal for a science-based, nonprofit environmental land trust — splits her time between Frederick County and Boulder, Colo. She has invited Carroll and Frederick leaders to visit Boulder to see how that city handles its trash, and they are responding favorably. They are working to organize a trip for mid-June. Boulder adopted a resolution in May 2006 to work toward becoming a zero-waste city. It uses Eco-Cycle, a nonprofit organization, to manage its recycling program to work toward that goal. Eco-Cycle provides recycling to about 800 businesses, and operates a community recycling center for items that are typically difficult to recycle, such as porcelain sinks, Styrofoam blocks and electronic equipment.

Incinerator meeting, decision dates announced

Gazette
Charles Schell
04/03/2008
Residents can give Carroll County’s Board of County Commissioners their opinions about a proposed regional ‘‘waste-to-energy” incinerator from 7 to 9 p.m. April 10 at a public hearing in Room 003 of the County Office Building, Westminster. But first they can learn more about the proposal that would create a partnership with Frederick County by attending a workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in Room 003 of the County Office Building, 225 N. Center St., Westminster. Frederick’s commissioners voted Feb. 26 to ask Carroll to join them in building a trash incinerator, what industry officials call a ‘‘waste-to-energy facility” because it burns trash to generate electricity. Assuming Carroll generated 600 tons of trash per day, a shared incinerator in Frederick would cost Carroll $140 million to build, compared to $200 million to build one alone. The workshop allows residents to ask questions about the county’s trash and recycling options, as well as the incinerator. Carroll commissioners, Department of Public Works staff and the Environmental Advisory Council will be on hand as well as selected trash experts. Carroll’s commissioners will convene at 11:30 a.m. April 17 in Room 311 of the County Office Building to deliberate and vote on whether they will accept Frederick County’s offer

Officials invited for a new look at trash

Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
04/03/2008
A woman who divides her time living in Frederick and Boulder, Colo., has invited officials from Frederick and Carroll counties to see how Boulder’s successful recycling program works. She sees the program as an alternative to the trash incinerator both counties are considering building here. Members of both county boards have spent the last week exchanging e-mails with Caroline Eader. Eader wants Frederick and Carroll officials to meet with representatives of Eco-Cycle Inc., a nonprofit recycling processor that has brought curbside recycling to Boulder residents and businesses since 1976. Eader touts Eco-Cycle’s efforts to create ‘‘zero waste.” The term means that all products and packaging is designed and built to be reused and recycled. Zero waste puts the responsibility of creating recyclable products on the manufacturers. Eco-Cycle is considered a ‘‘resource recovery” processor, because the items it collects are later sold on the open market. "... I would like you to see what a community can accomplish when it has the desire and the facilities in place to achieve a common goal,” Eader wrote in her e-mail invitation to both boards.

Residents tout alternatives to burning trash in advance of public hearing

Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
12/06/2007
For weeks, incinerator opponents have been encouraging residents to come out Tuesday to tell Frederick County commissioners to scrap the idea of building one here. "We're out canvassing the area and going door to door," said Janice Wiles, executive director of Friends of Frederick County, a group that promotes a better quality of life. ''We've already got several businesses on board." The group has distributed postcards to businesses in downtown Frederick asking residents to come out to Tuesday night's public hearing and voice support to increase recycling instead of spending money to build an incinerator. "It is critical that Frederick County residents show up in force to urge our elected leaders that we must examine other options for disposing of our trash before we move forward," said Alane Hartley, cofounder of the Waste Study Group and a member of Friends of Frederick County. "Local taxpayers have a right to demand more transparency in a process that could potentially create more debt and pollute the air our children breathe."

Carroll’s environmental council says no to plan

Group prefers to increase recycling, charge residents by weight of their trash
Gazette
Charles Schelle
11/01/2007
As the Carroll Board of County Commissioners considers whether to build a trash incinerator, Environmental Advisory Council members have their own opinion about the plant: No way. "Our recommendation is that we not pursue waste-to-energy [incineration], and not pursue it for a period of at least five years,” said Sher Horosko, a member of the Environmental Advisory Council. Horosko’s comments drew applause from the audience at an Oct. 24 Frederick Board of County Commissioners meeting. "[The incinerator] will not have support of a single member of our Environmental Advisory Council,” she said.