[Brunswick] Mayoral candidates share vision for future of city at debate

Frederick News Post
Nicholas C. Stern
07/20/2012
When Mayor Carroll Jones ran for office in 2008, he said it would be his last time. Yet, he also said he wanted to see a resolution to a dispute with Rosemont over providing a new waterline to the neighboring village, Jones said Thursday at a mayoral debate at Beans in the Belfry with Karin Tome, Brunswick councilwoman and fellow mayoral candidate. "We have made a lot of progress, but we are not there yet," he said. In June, Jones announced his plans to run for re-election to another four-year term as mayor. The election is set for Aug. 7. In August, he will have been in office as mayor for 12 years, with 10 prior years spent on the City Council.

County officials beginning growth plans with Brunswick

Frederick News Post
Nicholas C. Stern
07/12/2012
County officials interested in aligning the county's growth plans with changes to municipal master plans will begin the process with Brunswick. In a public hearing today, county commissioners will discuss updating the county's principal planning document to coincide with Brunswick's stated planning goals over the next two decades and beyond. That alignment would be dubbed the 2012 Brunswick Community Plan Amendment. Adopted by the Brunswick mayor and council in November, the city's plan reflects projected growth of about 500 acres, according to Bruce Dell, Brunswick's planning and zoning administrator. About 75 percent of the growth is planned for the east side of the city, with the remainder to the west.

Tome announces bid for Brunswick mayor

Frederick News Post
Nicholas C. Stern
03/29/2012
Karin Tome, a Brunswick City Council member, plans to run for mayor in August. A 20-year city resident, Tome, 53, was elected to the council in 2008 after about a year of active involvement and opposition to the city's annexation of the Brunswick Crossing development, which almost doubled the size of the city, she said. Brunswick Crossing, which opened in 2010, is expected to eventually include some 1,500 houses. Tome supported a failed 2001 referendum on the annexation, mostly because she believed it would create a divide in the city, she said. "I didn't want to see Brunswick go in that direction," Tome said. "Rather, I wanted to see Brunswick grow out slowly." As the development begins to grow, along with renewed interest in downtown investment, Tome said she wants to foster mutual respect and cooperation among newcomers with fresh ideas for the future and lifelong residents who built the railroad city and may find the transition difficult. "I see myself in the role of continuing that transition," she said.