Smith’s simplistic commentary

Frederick News Post
Jack Lynch
07/08/2013
Recent commentary by Frederick County Commissioner Paul Smith exposes the simplistic political logic of the current Board of County Commissioners and of the statewide Chesapeake Coalition. At its base, it rejects firm science and portrays the problem as an out-of-state boogeyman to deflect attention from our real-life issues and responsibility for cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The citizens of Frederick County, and of Maryland, deserve better from our local elected leaders. As one dedicated over many years towards the careful practice of environmental stewardship and water quality while respecting history and economics and sustainability, I demand better deliberation, thought and action in these responsibilities from us all.

Smith's simplistic commentary

Frederick News Post
Jack Lynch
07/08/2013
Recent commentary by Frederick County Commissioner Paul Smith exposes the simplistic political logic of the current Board of County Commissioners and of the statewide Chesapeake Coalition. At its base, it rejects firm science and portrays the problem as an out-of-state boogeyman to deflect attention from our real-life issues and responsibility for cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The citizens of Frederick County, and of Maryland, deserve better from our local elected leaders. As one dedicated over many years towards the careful practice of environmental stewardship and water quality while respecting history and economics and sustainability, I demand better deliberation, thought and action in these responsibilities from us all.

Monocacy River foul

Frederick News Post
06/12/2013
The Monocacy Scenic River Citizens Advisory Board is taking new steps in an attempt to stop the dumping of old tires into the Monocacy River. Tire dumping into the Monocacy has become a worrisome issue for the river board in recent years, so along with county officials they’re going to ensure that all county bridges that span the Monocacy are marked as such, along with prominent signs that warn of the fine for illegal dumping. Many of these bridges have heretofore been unmarked and missing signs indicating that dumping is prohibited

City Limits

The Frederick Citizen
Jack Lynch
07/31/2012
Looking ahead towards the upcoming City of Frederick Comprehensive Planning process, and looking back over the last two previous Comp Plans, yields a few insights into various theories and outcomes from our public process that suggest alternatives to continued municipal growth. Rather than a growth, no-growth argument and its corresponding fallacy of economic benefit, we would achieve better results and improve citizen’s lives by following a model of ”benefit area” as our thinking. To try to summarize this concept of benefit area, let’s consider the current model, which assumes that a physical and economic growth model improves the quality of life.

Mooney moves to stop incinerator near battlefield

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
02/28/2009
Citing the historic nature of the Monocacy National Battlefield, Sen. Alex Mooney introduced legislation Friday that would prohibit building or operating an incinerator within one mile of a national park. His bill comes in reaction to the Frederick County Commissioners' consideration of a site near the battlefield for an incinerator, also known as a waste-to-energy plant, which would burn trash to generate electricity. It could have a smokestack as tall as 350 feet. The commissioners chose the McKinney Industrial Park as a site to take to public hearing this month. The county-owned site is off Buckeystown Pike. "The battlefield is important, it's an important battle," Mooney said. "I'd hate to see a smokestack put up right next to it, detracting from the attractiveness of the location." Known as the "battle that saved Washington," the one-day conflict at Monocacy delayed Confederate troops as they marched unsuccessfully toward the capital in 1864. Battlefield Superintendent Susan Trail has objected to the site, saying the smokestack would be visually intrusive. The Civil War Preservation Trust named the battlefield one of the most endangered Civil War sites last year because of the incinerator threat. The commissioners have proposed waste-to-energy as a way to combat the county's growing waste disposal needs. They hope to stop the costly practice of hauling trash to a Virginia landfill. Commissioner Kai Hagen, the only opponent of the incinerator on the board, supports Mooney's bill.

New county plan aims to preserve rural character of Braddock Heights

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
12/06/2009
The rural reaches of Braddock Heights would stay that way under a new comprehensive plan being considered by the Frederick County Commissioners. Areas that were targeted for growth under the comprehensive plan passed in 1998 will be scaled back to a designation that will not allow new houses in many areas. If the plan is approved, some people who hoped to sell a portion of their land might not be able to do so. The plan aims to preserve what makes the area desirable, according to Tim Goodfellow, a county planner who worked on the Braddock Heights plan. The county commissioners support the proposed Braddock Heights changes.

Legal action won’t delay incinerator

Design, permitting continues for trash-burning facility
Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
11/19/2009
Legal action will not delay the permitting and designing process of an incinerator in Frederick County, according to a county official. Michael G. Marschner, director of the county's Division of Utilities and Solid Waste Management, said this week the process will continue despite an appeal filed in Circuit Court Friday. "The [Board of County Commissioners] have already signed agreements with the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority and they have been working on the design and permitting process," Marschner said. "It's a long process and they [NMWDA] have been instructed to do so. Yes, we're still moving forward."

Legal action won't delay incinerator

Design, permitting continues for trash-burning facility
Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
11/19/2009
Legal action will not delay the permitting and designing process of an incinerator in Frederick County, according to a county official. Michael G. Marschner, director of the county's Division of Utilities and Solid Waste Management, said this week the process will continue despite an appeal filed in Circuit Court Friday. "The [Board of County Commissioners] have already signed agreements with the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority and they have been working on the design and permitting process," Marschner said. "It's a long process and they [NMWDA] have been instructed to do so. Yes, we're still moving forward."

New trash disposal option considered

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
03/05/2009
The county's waste-to-energy debate just got a little more complicated. Frederick County Commissioners Jan Gardner and Charles Jenkins announced Wednesday that they will look into another trash disposal option. This one uses a mechanical biological treatment system. The commissioners have considered building a $527 million incinerator that would burn trash and convert some of it into electricity. The idea has passionate supporters and detractors. Gardner and Jenkins plan to go to a March 16 conference in Philadelphia and meet with representatives of ArrowBio, the most well-known builder of mechanical biological treatment systems. None exist in the United States. There is one in Australia and one in Israel. The commissioners have boosted household recycling options this year. Still, that probably won't significantly reduce the 600 to 800 tons of daily residential trash that the county collects. Most of the county's trash is trucked to a landfill in southern Virginia, an option the county will have through 2015. The commissioners are looking for a more permanent option. "On a number of fronts, ArrowBio seems promising," Jenkins said at Wednesday's press conference. A ballpark estimate of the cost is $75 million to $100 million. If the county decides to build an incinerator with Wheelabrator, the company county staff recommends, the plant could cost the county up to $325 million. Carroll County would pay the rest. The two counties would share the plant, but it would be built in Frederick County.

Public hearing on waste-to-energy brings crowd

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
02/18/2009
Debt, dioxins, outdated technology and traffic were just some of the reasons Frederick County residents gave for opposing a proposed waste-to-energy plant during a public hearing before the County Commissioners on Tuesday night. Most of the speakers opposed the incinerator, which is projected to cost the county $325 million. Carroll County would assume an additional $200 million of the cost, if the two counties decide to proceed. The commissioners are considering whether to build the incinerator to handle 800 tons of trash Frederick County residents generate per day. Most of that trash is being sent to an out-of-state landfill. County officials said that is not a long-term solution. At least 60 people signed up to speak at the hearing, which will be continued at 7 p.m. Thursday. Three local developers said the incinerator would be a blight for residents and businesses who are within a few miles of the Md. 85 corridor. The site being considered is on Metropolitan Court, off English Muffin Way, across the Monocacy River from the Monocacy National Battlefield.

Mooney against proposed plant near battlefield

Frederick News Post
Karen Gardner
02/17/2009
Alex Mooney might use his position in the Maryland State Senate to keep a proposed Frederick County waste-to-energy plant from being built adjacent to the Monocacy National Battlefield. Mooney met with people interested in the issue Monday at the McKinney industrial site off Metropolitan Court near the county's Division of Public Utilities and Solid Waste offices. Until a few weeks ago, he said, he hadn't been involved in the county's proposal to build an incinerator with Carroll County to deal with increasing trash. At a public meeting Feb. 3, the county commissioners decided to schedule a public hearing for tonight on two sites being considered for the incinerator. Both sites are in Mooney's district. One of those sites, where Potomac Edison once planned a power plant east of Point of Rocks, was scrapped last week because it is in the Carrollton Manor Rural Legacy Area.