[Montgomery County] Organic farm advocates to host fundraiser

Gazette
Ryan Marshall
06/13/2013
Supporters of an organic farm in Potomac are trying to improve their relationship with the Montgomery County Board of Education after a legal controversy over the property, but the school system doesn’t seem to be in a hurry to mend fences. About 150 people, including a crowd of Montgomery County senators, delegates and council members, are expected to attend a fundraiser tonight at Glenview Mansion in Rockville to benefit the nonprofit Brickyard Educational Farm on Brickyard Road in Potomac.

Pulte housing plan for 1,000 units in Boyds under fire

Coalition recommends shifting density to unbuilt Clarksburg Town Center
Gazette
Virginia Terhune
06/12/2013
[Montgomery] County environmentalists are recommending that a plan by the Pulte Group to build 1,000 homes on three ridges in the Ten Mile Creek watershed in Boyds be scaled back or eliminated by placing most of the 538-acre rural site into the county’s Agriculture Reserve. “The only way to preserve fragile water systems is to cap development in their watersheds, clear and simple,” according to a 26-page report released June 6 by the Save Ten Mile Creek Coalition.

O’Malley ponders veto of trash bill

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
04/30/2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley is considering requests to veto legislation that would provide financial incentives for electricity generation through waste-to-energy trash incinerators. More than 30 organizations signed a joint letter to the governor asking for the veto. The bill, which passed 24-20 in the Senate and 74-60 in the House of Delegates, would elevate waste-to-energy to the same level as solar and wind power when it comes to renewable energy credits. Nonprofit organizations in the areas of public health, the environment, and for promoting a sustainable economy said the bill would undermine Maryland's efforts to reduce overall energy consumption and fight global climate change. Frederick County, which is planning to build a waste-to-energy plant, stands to benefit from the legislation. If the legislation is enacted, the county would boost electricity revenue by selling credits. Frederick County Commissioners President Blaine Young wrote to O'Malley on Friday asking him to sign the bill into law.

O'Malley ponders veto of trash bill

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
04/30/2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley is considering requests to veto legislation that would provide financial incentives for electricity generation through waste-to-energy trash incinerators. More than 30 organizations signed a joint letter to the governor asking for the veto. The bill, which passed 24-20 in the Senate and 74-60 in the House of Delegates, would elevate waste-to-energy to the same level as solar and wind power when it comes to renewable energy credits. Nonprofit organizations in the areas of public health, the environment, and for promoting a sustainable economy said the bill would undermine Maryland's efforts to reduce overall energy consumption and fight global climate change. Frederick County, which is planning to build a waste-to-energy plant, stands to benefit from the legislation. If the legislation is enacted, the county would boost electricity revenue by selling credits. Frederick County Commissioners President Blaine Young wrote to O'Malley on Friday asking him to sign the bill into law.

Resident wants fair to recycle

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
07/17/2008
The Great Frederick Fair attracts a lot of attention -- and generates a lot of trash. One county woman hopes to focus that attention on where the trash goes by encouraging more recycling at the fair. Myersville resident Mary Posey wrote an e-mail to the fair organizers this week asking them to implement more recycling. And she'd like to see more recycling at all fairs and events throughout the county. She believes fairs can educate people about the county's shrinking landfill space. The county is considering building a trash incinerator, an idea that Posey opposes. She would prefer more waste diversion and recycling. "I am very, very concerned a lot of people are not informed about the county's waste crisis," Posey said. Posey has lived in Frederick County since 1965 and has been going to the fair every year since 1966. In an e-mail, she suggested newspaper photographers should take pictures of mounds of trash generated at the fair every day.