No Better Off

Frederick News Post
Sally Sorbello
03/16/2013
In response to the Feb. 26 article, “Incinerator faces numbers crunch,” I was struck by a quote from Commissioner Gray. Mr. Gray said that “We were not going to be a dumping ground for other people’s trash.” The reality is that the proposed 1,500-ton-per-day incinerator depends on Frederick to be a dumping ground for other people’s trash. Frederick and partner Carroll County together produce less than half the trash needed to supply the incinerator its minimum tonnage, so the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority (NMWDA) plans for Frederick to import up to 350,000 tons of trash and tires per year to achieve the contracted requirement to burn in excess of 500,000 tons annually.

Hefty NMWDA fees

Frederick News Post
Sally Sorbello
10/27/2011
In response to the call by the Frederick County Commissioners for ideas on how to cut county costs, I have one: Stop being a member county of the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority. NMWDA is the independent "instrumentality" of the state of Maryland that will own the regional trash incinerator to be sited here in Frederick County. NMWDA has been leading Frederick and Carroll counties toward the possibly bankrupting incinerator since Frederick County became a member in 2004, and NMWDA will benefit handsomely from the facility.Not including the huge construction costs and escalating management/administrative fees, Frederick can save millions of dollars in membership fees alone if we quit being a member county of NMWDA.

Local recycling increasing

Frederick News Post
Meg Tully
12/22/2008
Frederick County's recycling and diversion rate was just over 44 percent in 2007, according to preliminary calculations by the Maryland Department of the Environment. Over the last decade, the rates show that the percentage of Frederick County waste recycled has generally increased. For instance, the recycling rate was about 34 percent in 1997, compared to 44.3 percent in 2007. The rate is calculated by the Maryland Department of Environment using data provided by Frederick County and following the regulations of the Maryland Recycling Act. As the Frederick County Commissioners are poised to make a decision on whether to build a trash incinerator, recycling rates have attracted new attention.

A Boulder approach

Frederick News Post
Katherine Heerbrandt
06/20/2008
If they can do it, why can't we? That's the inspiring message that most politicians, citizens and journalists brought home recently from Boulder, Colo., about Frederick County's ability to reduce and recycle trash. The trip was the brainchild of resident Caroline Eader who joined long-time efforts led by resident Sally Sorbello to look for alternatives to a $350 million, 1,500-ton regional incinerator in Frederick County. But Kevin Demoskly, deputy director of solid waste for the county, told The Gazette that there's "a different mindset" in Boulder than in Frederick. His gloomy assessment of residents' willingness to change their lifestyles reflects the thinking of much of the pro-incinerator crowd, including a majority of the county commissioners. But that's selling people short. And, in fact, most of those who traveled west say they were surprised at how little impact there was on their "daily habits." Jim Racheff, a Frederick resident and a rumored contender in the 2010 county commissioner race, said the trip proved that there's "nothing magical about Boulder."

Residents tout alternatives to burning trash in advance of public hearing

Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
12/06/2007
For weeks, incinerator opponents have been encouraging residents to come out Tuesday to tell Frederick County commissioners to scrap the idea of building one here. "We're out canvassing the area and going door to door," said Janice Wiles, executive director of Friends of Frederick County, a group that promotes a better quality of life. ''We've already got several businesses on board." The group has distributed postcards to businesses in downtown Frederick asking residents to come out to Tuesday night's public hearing and voice support to increase recycling instead of spending money to build an incinerator. "It is critical that Frederick County residents show up in force to urge our elected leaders that we must examine other options for disposing of our trash before we move forward," said Alane Hartley, cofounder of the Waste Study Group and a member of Friends of Frederick County. "Local taxpayers have a right to demand more transparency in a process that could potentially create more debt and pollute the air our children breathe."

County to sponsor solid waste forum

Gazette
Sherry Greenfield
03/08/2007
Residents will have an opportunity to learn about trash disposal options in Frederick County next weekend. The Frederick Board of County Commissioners will sponsor a forum on solid waste from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., March 17, at Frederick Community College’s Jack B. Kussmaul Theater. The forum is free and open to the public. "The county commissioners recognize that solid waste issues, such as recycling and waste-to-energy proposals, are of utmost importance to the citizens of Frederick County,” said Michael Marschner, director of Utilities and Solid Waste Management, in a press release. "At their direction, we are pleased to host this solid waste forum to address some of the most pressing issues facing the county and to allow citizens the opportunity to ask questions and receive feedback from experts in the field.” The county is in the process of looking into the construction of a trash-burning incinerator, or what is being called a ‘‘waste-to-energy facility.” These plants uses trash as fuel to generate electricity that could be sold to an electric utility, such as Allegheny Power.