Stroll and the City

Frederick Magazine
07/10/2013
Frederick City’s planning office works to make sure residents and visitors can traipse through the city with ease. Deputy Director of Planning Joe Adkins has a pedometer clipped to his belt and estimates that at least a half dozen of his staff regularly walk or bike to city hall. Downtown, with its tree-lined side streets and historic buildings to admire, speaks for itself as a great place to walk, as does Baker Park and Carroll Creek Linear Park. But Adkins says plans are moving forward with projects such as a pathway from the Golden Mile to Downtown and one connecting Worman’s Mill to the MARC Station on East Street, following the railroad tracks. He sounds almost gleeful when he talks about the idea of using the temporary pedestrian bridge on Motter Avenue, “if we can get it at a good price,” as a permanent link over Md. 26. Walkers grooving with their way of getting around tend to evangelize. On a recent rainy Sunday, about 60 people delayed their dinners to fill the seats in City Hall to listen to Washington, D.C., architect and city planner Jeff Speck talk about Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America One Step at a Time, the title of his newest book. Speck is a huge fan of Frederick and if certain pieces of his family’s life hadn’t fallen into place he would now be calling the place home. “Frederick is a good example of a city that has great bones. Frederick may not be as dense or as large as other cities, but at its heart it performs extremely well,” he says.

Letter from a millennial: We’re not going to buy your house

Baltimore Business Journal
James Briggs
06/19/2013
If you're a homeowner, there has been a lot of great news for you lately — namely rising home prices, lack of inventory and bidding wars among increasingly desperate buyers. Although the housing market isn't on fire like it was in the early 2000s, it also isn't imploding like it was in 2009. All in all, if you're looking to sell a house now, you should feel thankful about your timing. But take heed, baby boomers and Generation Xers. If you're planning to hold onto your home for years to come, don't count on my generation — the millennials — to buy it from you.

Letter from a millennial: We're not going to buy your house

Baltimore Business Journal
James Briggs
06/19/2013
If you're a homeowner, there has been a lot of great news for you lately — namely rising home prices, lack of inventory and bidding wars among increasingly desperate buyers. Although the housing market isn't on fire like it was in the early 2000s, it also isn't imploding like it was in 2009. All in all, if you're looking to sell a house now, you should feel thankful about your timing. But take heed, baby boomers and Generation Xers. If you're planning to hold onto your home for years to come, don't count on my generation — the millennials — to buy it from you.